Archive for Robert Pattinson

Shockingly Terrible Books

Posted in Books, Dan Brown, G. P. Taylor, Lists, Personal Musings, Samuel Richardson, Stephenie Meyer with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 8 December, 2008 by Nicola

Needless to say, I read a lot, and I have a few rules to reading.  One is to always finish a book you have started.  If it is bad, at least give yourself knowledge of the whole thing to write a better negative review of it.  People deserve to know the truth; I’ll take on the pain, so others do not have to!  Another rule is to read every hyped up book.  Why?  If it is popular, I consider that there must be a reason.  And I’m nosey.  I must investigate.  A more infrequent rule is to pick up a book simply on the strength of its cover every now and again.  Armed with these rules, you just know that the only natural course, is the course to some very bad books.   I list some of my worst experiences here.

The Twilight Saga by Stephenie Meyer (2006-2008)

If you read my book reviews, you’ll know that I reviewed the first book of this series, Twilight, and that I gave it quite a fair review.  It’s enjoyable, I said, but very poor writing with a structure that resembles what China would be like if it were an anarchist establishment.  I smiled at it, gave Meyer a patronising pat on the head, and let the bad literature go.  I just let it go.  As I got further and further into the series, however, my good nature was pushed to its limits and I lost my patience with possibly the worst writer to ever be published.  I thought that, perhaps, she has the mental age of a twelve year old and was called “the fat kid” one too many times during gym class.  There are so many things wrong with this series that I don’t even know how to start.  If you can imagine every bad thing a writer can do to their novel you will pretty much have summed up Stephenie Meyer.  I’m just going to take a deep breath, and list things until I get bored: Continue reading

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Anticipating the Twilight Movie: Twilight Trailers

Posted in Film, Twilight with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 1 December, 2008 by Nicola

The official movie poster for Twilight.  Robert Pattinson plays Edward Cullen and Kirsten Stewart plays Isabella Swan.

Fan girls worldwide are getting geared up for the movie adaptation of Stephenie Meyer‘s best selling novel Twilight.  It is the first novel of four of The Twilight Saga and has a fan following of a similar nature to J.K. Rowling‘s Harry Potter series.  With midnight release parties, an author shot into celebrity status, 50 million books sold, and a huge online following, Twilight looks set to become an instant success.

The difference between Twilight‘s success and Harry Potter‘s is that whilst Twilight has a very dedicated following, it contains only teenage girls and young women.  For that reason, the film and the books, will probably never be as big as the inclusive and generally appealing Harry Potter series.  However, a following of young girls and women is probably the best type of the following when trying to hold the public’s attention for a period of time, and teenage girls and their obsessive nature (much in the same way for boy bands and baby faced actors) are sure to be giving their undivided attention when their Edward Cullen graces the big screen.  However, just how long can Twilight last as a movie franchise?  Could it ever be as successful as Harry Potter?  Probably not, and I’ll discuss why. Continue reading

Stephenie Meyer’s “Twilight”

Posted in Books, Stephenie Meyer with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 1 December, 2008 by Nicola

I consider it my personal duty to read a hyped up book. I must do it. I must have my own opinion, no matter how decided the public are, no matter how slated it is by elitists. I usually side with elitists when it comes to books. Generally speaking, I much prefer to sit down with classics than to pick out anything from today’s literary world. Maybe it was drilled into me by reading classic after classic for my degree.  Who knows?

Despite this, I have a weakness for hyped up books. Why? Blame it on Harry Potter. When I was sixteen (ooooh, seven years ago) I was mocking Harry Potter along with everyone else. Until I read it, that is. And here is my weakness. The reason why I picked up Twilight by Stephenie Meyer. Like anything that is hyped up, people want to swoop in and belittle it, because it is popular. Harry Potter is popular, and to this very day I still come across the odd person that wants to insult it, criticise it and put it down. The pattern that emerges when this happens, however, is that the person in question has not picked up the damn books. I think to myself that they simply would not be saying these things if they actually made the effort to read them; they would, more than likely, become engrossed, like almost everybody else has in the world.

Continue reading