Archive for Jane Austen

Shockingly Fantastic Books: Jane Austen’s “Northanger Abbey”

Posted in Books, Jane Austen, Shockingly Fantastic Books with tags , , , , , , , , on 16 December, 2008 by Nicola

Shockingly Fantastic Books will be a weekly series by me, where I pick out one of my favourite books to write about.  All of the books in this series can be found at the bottom of the post, and they will be struck out as I write about them.

Northanger Abbey – Jane Austen
One of my favourite books of all time and unfortunately lays quite forgotten due to the constant whoring of Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility. Not a bad thing, since both are great books as well. This novel is not quite clear cut as the others as the heroines marriage is not really the centre of the plot. It’s rather a-coming-of-age affair as the protagonist, totally inexperienced in society, who only knows the world of gothic novels, has to come to terms with the things she has read, and what actually happens in the real world. Continue reading

Advertisements

Current and Near Future Endeavors

Posted in Diary, Personal Musings with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 5 December, 2008 by Nicola

Here is a list with what I am currently engaged with, so expect a review soon, and what I am expecting to read, watch or listen to in the future.  In order.

BOOKS

Currently reading:

  • Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Future reads:

  • Shirley by Charlotte Bronte
  • The Hunchback of Notre-Dame by Victor Hugo
  • The Life and Death on Anne Boleyn by E. W. Ives

MUSIC

Awaiting reviews:

  • A Winter Symphony by Sarah Brightman
  • Spirit by Leona Lewis
  • Funhouse by P!nk

Future listens:

  • Bittersweet Symphony by Jade Valerie
  • V for Vendetta Film Score by Dario Marianelli
  • Tenor at the Movies by Jonathan Ansell

FILMS

Awaiting reviews:

  • Twilight (2008)
  • Howl’s Moving Castle (2005)

Future viewing:

  • The Edge of Love (2008)
  • The Duchess (2008)

I will try to get all of these done, so if you are interested in any, keep an eye out.  If anyone spots anything in my future endeavors that should be avoided at all costs, make sure to warn me!

The Best Films of All Time

Posted in A Little Princess, Aliens, Atonement, Beauty and the Beast, Film, Howl's Moving Castle, Lists, Lost In Translation, Love Actually, Personal Musings, Pride & Prejudice, Schindler's List, Spirited Away, The Fifth Element with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 4 December, 2008 by Nicola

I will say this. I do not like films. I am serious. I do not like romantic comedies, horror, science fiction, thrillers or any other genre for that matter as a general rule. For me to like a film, it either has nostalgia value, or it has to be artfully brilliant. The scores or soundtracks to films are a huge factor in my liking a film. Sometimes, a film can be downright silly, but extremely entertaining. This is why I think it may be worthy to mention the rare times a film has captured me and the ones I actually enjoyed.

Pride & Prejudice – Joe Wright
My favourite film of all time by a mile. First of all, it helps that I am a period drama fan, love Literature and most of all, adore Jane Austen. Even considering this there are plenty of versions of this classic and even more period dramas out there, but this one comes out on top. I must have seen it over a dozen times by now. I first went to see it at the cinema and I found myself grinning goofily at the screen as I willed the protagonists on with all of my heart and soul. Now, I hate RomComs, and I am no soppy female that swoons over handsome men on the screen, but I think my heart stopped when Mr. Darcy came out of the fog. Not only was it beautifully shot but Dario Marianelli‘s score at that point was just magical. Speaking of which, the score of this film is probably the element that sets this film apart from the others. The Pride and Prejudice score is by far my favourite album which I play from beginning to end over and over again. Joe Wright proves himself to be one of the most promising new directors with this film. Sadly, he was robbed of his Oscar.

Aliens – James Cameron
I think this is largely nostalgia, though it scared me when I was young. Strictly speaking, I do not really enjoy any of the films in this franchise. I find the second film, Aliens, to be the most tolerable. What I am in love with is the creature itself. I think it is a fantastic creation and it is the model of the Aliens xenomorph which I favour. The new CGI aliens in the latest AVP films do not cut it for me. I mean, the creature itself is so mind blowingly awesome. Every part of its body is sharp and deadly, it has, like, three mouths, it bleeds pure acid, so if you shoot it, you get gunked and you still lose, it is really fast, it swims, and it is born inside living hosts. That is an alarmingly lethal foe. And Ripley is awesome. Continue reading

Nicola’s Top Ten Writers “Hall of Fame”

Posted in Anne McCaffrey, Bill Bryson, Books, Charlotte Bronte, J. K. Rowling, James Clemens, Jane Austen, Lists, Margaret Atwood, Personal Musings, Sarah Waters, Trudi Canavan, Wilkie Collins with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 1 December, 2008 by Nicola

I am an English Literature Graduate, I work in a library, and I am always reading a book.  There would obviously come a time when I realised that I loved some writers more than others.  Not that my opinion counts for anything, but I am going to throw it out there anyway.  Perhaps someone agrees with me, perhaps my opinion will englighten someone.  You never know, it might happen.  So here are my top ten writers, counting down from number 10.

10. Sarah Waters
Sarah Waters. Let’s see.  Ah, yes.  She is British.  Wilkie Collins is her favourite writer.  She is a feminist.  She sets her novels in the Victorian era.  I think she’s also a lesbian, but that’s neither here or there.  What’s not to like?  Waters tends to write Historical novels set in the Victorian era (notably a time of extreme sexual oppression) with a feminist slant but without sounding preachy.  She creates genuine atmosphere and really knows how to build suspense.  Her work is well researched, and she writes convincingly within the context’s style whilst not alienating her audience.  Her most well known novels are Fingersmith (2002) and Tipping the Velvet (1998), but my personal favourite is Affinity (1999).

Continue reading