Reading List for February and March

I swear I think of a new book to read with every passing day.  In an attempt to keep track, I am going to write them down here.  Once they are under the watchful eye of my readers (because it seems that I have some, apparently) I will be sure to get through them.  Maybe.

I will try to read in this order, then:

The Gunslinger by Stephen King
I have never tried Stephen King.  Well, he is American, so it is not like I am going to pick him out on my own.  No, a colleague at work, who’s judgement I happen to trust, recommended The Dark Tower series to me.  Since I see her everyday, I better deal with her recommendation first.  I have taken out books two and three from the series, anticipating that I will want to continue (as the first book is yet to arrive), so here’s hoping.

Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China by Jung Chang
This book was recommended by somebody who reads my blog (that is a nice thing to do in the first place).  Sometimes I will take recommendations seriously, others I will not.  I decided to take this one seriously because I am ignorant of all things China.  I do not like ignorance.  I must remedy it where I can.  Not that this one book will make me an expert, but I would like to know at least something about the country, even if it just the lives or three women that lived there.

The Reader by Bernhard Schlink
I watched the film yesterday evening and I loved every frame.  I am very curious about its source material and it is with a heavy heart that it is shoved to third place on my list.

Hayley Westenra: In Her Own Voice by Hayley Westenra
In light of my Hayley Westenra Marathon, I am going to try to read this.  I doubt I will like it much, though it cannot be as bad as her last biography (yes, this is her second, though she had no input in the first one).  She’s a really nice young lady, but really, she is just too nice and is not likely to make an interesting read.  But we shall see.

The Life and Death on Anne Boleyn by E. W. Ives
I started this last year when I ordered it from some library.  Unfortunately it is the only copy in the county (wtf) so I had to give it back because people had reserved it.  It is only low on my list because I imagine it will be a long time before I see it again.  The person that reserved it whilst I had it hasn’t even picked the book up from the library, let alone take it out for another three weeks.  Inconsiderate people!

Lolita by Vladimir Nabikov
I have been curious about this book for a while.  One of my favourite musicians has a song based on this novel.  It has been on my reading list for a while, but it keeps being pushed back when I find other books to read.  I have to read it at some point because it was a Christmas present.

No Name by Wilkie Collins
I keep meaning to read this again.  And lots of his other books.  But since I own my very own copy and know it will always be on my book shelf, I am in no hurry.

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4 Responses to “Reading List for February and March”

  1. […] Reading List for February and March « Nicola’s Thoughts on Anything […]

  2. […] Reading List for February and March . I swear I think of a new book to read with every passing day. In an attempt to keep track, I am going to write them down here. Once they are under the watchful eye of my readers (because it seems that I have some, apparently) I will be sure to get through … Shockingly Fantastic Books: Jane Austen’s “Northanger Abbey” · More favorite things · Three Books I Am Most Looking Forward to Reading This Year · Safe material for early readers …More […]

  3. Hello, violetfaerie from the EA forum here. Bought Wilkie Collins’ “The Law and the Lady” from the library the other day, pretty bad condition, obviously well-read! May get to it this month.

  4. I would like to update this list and say that I have finished the Hayley Westenra autobiography, and ‘The Reader’. A colleague threw ‘The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas’ at me, so I am reading that at the moment. Not on the list, but what can you do? 🙂

    The Law and the Lady is on my list too. I started reading it during my degree (when I shouldn’t have done, I have had eight other books to read instead), but I never got round to finishing it. It’s supposed to be his best book outside of his “golden decade” (1860s)

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